Archives for the month of: July, 2012
This is a really enjoyable video. It’s pure fun. What a good way to start off the day.
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Many artists are inspired by the movies. Recently, I’ve noticed a trend of re-imaging movie posters into creative works of art. Here a few of my favorites. 

Bettlejuice (1988)
Source:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/brandonschaefer/3287980514/in/photostream/ 
The Shinning ( 1980)
Source:
Unknown
Network (1977)
Source:
http://blog.signalnoise.com/2009/03/16/network/
The Dark Knight (2008)
Source:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/brandonschaefer/3267780877/ 
Harry Potter
and the Philosopher’s Stone
(2001)
Source:
http://mscorley.blogspot.com/2009/02/harry-potter-redesign.html 
American Psycho (2000)
Source:
http://www.justinreedart.com/
Superman (1978)
Source:
http://www.justinreedart.com/

Many artists are inspired by the movies. Recently, I’ve noticed a trend of re-imaging movie posters into creative works of art. Here a few of my favorites. 

Bettlejuice (1988)
Source:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/brandonschaefer/3287980514/in/photostream/ 
The Shinning ( 1980)
Source:
Unknown
Network (1977)
Source:
http://blog.signalnoise.com/2009/03/16/network/
The Dark Knight (2008)
Source:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/brandonschaefer/3267780877/ 
Harry Potter
and the Philosopher’s Stone
(2001)
Source:
http://mscorley.blogspot.com/2009/02/harry-potter-redesign.html 
American Psycho (2000)
Source:
http://www.justinreedart.com/
Superman (1978)
Source:
http://www.justinreedart.com/

I remember being excited about the Olympics, but these days, I have no interest. The Olympic spectacle seems more about grandiosity, pageantry, and securing lucrative endorsement contracts for its prized athletes than the competition.

Let’s face it, the Olympics are about big business, commercialism, and frivolous entertainment. I even read that the hand dryers in the restrooms at the Olympic venues have had their manufacturer logos covered up by Olympic sponsor logos. Those Olympic officials don’t miss any opportunity to make a buck. 

More significantly, coverage of the athletic competitions themselves is dominated by those syrupy “Up Close and Personal” features, segments showcasing this or that particular athlete who has overcome some form of adversity. They run on and on, taking time away from the actual events. They make the Olympics look more like “Days Of Our Lives” than a sports event. (Apparently, these segments are intended to appeal to the female viewership.)

On the other hand, the Olympics have made some progress on the political front. There’s less political strife: the Capitalist versus the Communist systems (Melbourne 1956), discrimination of African-Americans (Mexico City 1968), boycotts (Moscow 1980, Los Angeles 1984), fascism (Berlin 1936), and terrorism (Munich 1972). 

So, instead of sitting in front of the TV watching the Olympics, I plan to do something beneficial: devote more time to physical activity.

I remember being excited about the Olympics, but these days, I have no interest. The Olympic spectacle seems more about grandiosity, pageantry, and securing lucrative endorsement contracts for its prized athletes than the competition.

Let’s face it, the Olympics are about big business, commercialism, and frivolous entertainment. I even read that the hand dryers in the restrooms at the Olympic venues have had their manufacturer logos covered up by Olympic sponsor logos. Those Olympic officials don’t miss any opportunity to make a buck. 

More significantly, coverage of the athletic competitions themselves is dominated by those syrupy “Up Close and Personal” features, segments showcasing this or that particular athlete who has overcome some form of adversity. They run on and on, taking time away from the actual events. They make the Olympics look more like “Days Of Our Lives” than a sports event. (Apparently, these segments are intended to appeal to the female viewership.)

On the other hand, the Olympics have made some progress on the political front. There’s less political strife: the Capitalist versus the Communist systems (Melbourne 1956), discrimination of African-Americans (Mexico City 1968), boycotts (Moscow 1980, Los Angeles 1984), fascism (Berlin 1936), and terrorism (Munich 1972). 

So, instead of sitting in front of the TV watching the Olympics, I plan to do something beneficial: devote more time to physical activity.

Is the bread in Berlin as bad as everyone says? Not really. It’s just that the bread in Berlin is not as good as in other parts of Germany. The Berliner Zeitung ran an article today rating the breads of Berlin. Unsurprisingly, most of the rated breads were judged average by the expert baker. However, three breads were found to be outstanding. I will definitely pay a visit to these places.  

Is the bread in Berlin as bad as everyone says? Not really. It’s just that the bread in Berlin is not as good as in other parts of Germany. The Berliner Zeitung ran an article today rating the breads of Berlin. Unsurprisingly, most of the rated breads were judged average by the expert baker. However, three breads were found to be outstanding. I will definitely pay a visit to these places.  

Now this House has some Character!
Courtesy of Der Tagesspiegel

Now this House has some Character!
Courtesy of Der Tagesspiegel

If you’re in Berlin the first weekend of August, I would recommend a visit to the Berliner Bierfestival. From August 3rd to August 5th, Berlin is hosting its annual beer fest, or as it’s known locally, the beer mile. It’s really worth attending, even if you’re not much of a beer drinker.

Last year, the festival set a new Guinness World Record with the longest beer garden in the world having a length of 1,820 meters. With more than 300 breweries participating from 86 countries, this is beer paradise. In addition, to beer, there is live music, food, and entertainment. This year, the event is focusing on the beers from the Baltic countries. The three day event is located on Karl-Marx Allee in Mitte/Friedrichshain and lasts from mid-day to the evening. BTW: The event is free!

Too bad I’m in Portland this year.