Archives for the month of: September, 2012

I can think of nothing more relaxing than spending a beautiful Sunday afternoon in Berlin’s Treptower Park. The leaves are just starting to turn and the air is crisp.



Treat yourself to beer, traditional German food, music, and dance by heading to the Zenner-Eierschale overlooking the Spree River. You might even find yourself on the dance floor. 

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I can think of nothing more relaxing than spending a beautiful Sunday afternoon in Berlin’s Treptower Park. The leaves are just starting to turn and the air is crisp.



Treat yourself to beer, traditional German food, music, and dance by heading to the Zenner-Eierschale overlooking the Spree River. You might even find yourself on the dance floor. 

The Berlin Marathon is tomorrow, and the police are already closing off many of the major streets to auto traffic. It makes for great bicycling, but it’s eerie riding on deserted streets. It reminds me of New York City as it prepared for Hurricane Irene in 2011.

The Berlin Marathon is tomorrow, and the police are already closing off many of the major streets to auto traffic. It makes for great bicycling, but it’s eerie riding on deserted streets. It reminds me of New York City as it prepared for Hurricane Irene in 2011.

It’s just a matter of time until we have the next global pandemic. There’s a fascinating article in today’s Guardian about the likelihood of the world experiencing a devastating pandemic, even more deadly that the Spanish Flu of 1918-19. 
It’s just a matter of time until we have the next global pandemic. There’s a fascinating article in today’s Guardian about the likelihood of the world experiencing a devastating pandemic, even more deadly that the Spanish Flu of 1918-19. 
The Cast of Enchanted April (1992)

The more I watch movies that are adapted from books, the more I see the two as completely different art forms evoking different kinds of pleasure.

During my recent flight to Berlin, I decided to read, Enchanted April, Elizabeth von Arnim’s 1922 novel (available for free on Project Gutenberg) about the trans-formative power of travel, and rediscovering love and hope. The 1992 film version is a favorite of mine, and I was curious to see how the novel would compare. Not surprisingly, the novel is just as clever, just as funny, and just as insightful as the movie. Although faithful to the book, the film makes a few changes to the story that, in my view, enhance the story’s character development and magical quality. Enchanted April is one of those rare examples of where the movie and the book are both enjoyable on their own terms. 

The Cast of Enchanted April (1992)

The more I watch movies that are adapted from books, the more I see the two as completely different art forms evoking different kinds of pleasure.

During my recent flight to Berlin, I decided to read, Enchanted April, Elizabeth von Arnim’s 1922 novel (available for free on Project Gutenberg) about the trans-formative power of travel, and rediscovering love and hope. The 1992 film version is a favorite of mine, and I was curious to see how the novel would compare. Not surprisingly, the novel is just as clever, just as funny, and just as insightful as the movie. Although faithful to the book, the film makes a few changes to the story that, in my view, enhance the story’s character development and magical quality. Enchanted April is one of those rare examples of where the movie and the book are both enjoyable on their own terms. 

When a tourist arrives in an unknown city, it’s usual that he or she is a little confused. I often get questions from tourists seeking information about sightseeing attractions, transit schedules, or where they can find a beer garden.

The other day, as I was riding the bus, a young man asked me where he could find Berlin’s old town (Alt-Stadt). That left me wondering. Even though Berlin has been around since the 13th century, it didn’t become an important city until the late 1800s, shortly after the industrial revolution and German consolidation. That makes Berlin relatively new by European standards. Moreover, most of “old” Berlin was destroyed during WWII. In fact, there is no “old-part” of Berlin to speak of. There are a few historic buildings scattered across the city, but no specific area that I would truly call “old.” So while Prague, Athens, and Rome are distinctly old, Berlin is modern through and through.   

When a tourist arrives in an unknown city, it’s usual that he or she is a little confused. I often get questions from tourists seeking information about sightseeing attractions, transit schedules, or where they can find a beer garden.

The other day, as I was riding the bus, a young man asked me where he could find Berlin’s old town (Alt-Stadt). That left me wondering. Even though Berlin has been around since the 13th century, it didn’t become an important city until the late 1800s, shortly after the industrial revolution and German consolidation. That makes Berlin relatively new by European standards. Moreover, most of “old” Berlin was destroyed during WWII. In fact, there is no “old-part” of Berlin to speak of. There are a few historic buildings scattered across the city, but no specific area that I would truly call “old.” So while Prague, Athens, and Rome are distinctly old, Berlin is modern through and through.