Archives for category: medicine

An intense debate over circumcision has been raging in Germany since early June when a Cologne court ruled that circumcision of a young boy on religious grounds amounted to grievous bodily harm and therefore illegal. The court found that children have a fundamental right to physical integrity. 

The decision outraged many German Jews and Muslims who questioned their lives and acceptance in Germany. The German Medical Association subsequently told doctors across the country to stop performing the procedure. The Berlin Senate subsequently introduced legislation that would allow boys to be circumcised once both parents have given written permission and shown proof of the “religious motivation and religious necessity of circumcision.” The Central Council of Jews in Germany rejected the proposal, which does not allow traditional Jewish mohels to perform the procedure.

Circumcision is a delicate issue due the religious passions involved, and it could take years before the issue is finally resolved. How does one balance the rights children and of parents. Balancing these two contrasting fundamental rights is complicated. Moreover, male circumcision isn’t the only religious practice based on religion. Polygamy is another practice, as is the prohibition of blood transfusions among Jehovah’s Witnesses, or the compulsory veiling and female circumcision of women in parts of the Islamic world. Why is one practice banned while another allowed.

An intense debate over circumcision has been raging in Germany since early June when a Cologne court ruled that circumcision of a young boy on religious grounds amounted to grievous bodily harm and therefore illegal. The court found that children have a fundamental right to physical integrity. 

The decision outraged many German Jews and Muslims who questioned their lives and acceptance in Germany. The German Medical Association subsequently told doctors across the country to stop performing the procedure. The Berlin Senate subsequently introduced legislation that would allow boys to be circumcised once both parents have given written permission and shown proof of the “religious motivation and religious necessity of circumcision.” The Central Council of Jews in Germany rejected the proposal, which does not allow traditional Jewish mohels to perform the procedure.

Circumcision is a delicate issue due the religious passions involved, and it could take years before the issue is finally resolved. How does one balance the rights children and of parents. Balancing these two contrasting fundamental rights is complicated. Moreover, male circumcision isn’t the only religious practice based on religion. Polygamy is another practice, as is the prohibition of blood transfusions among Jehovah’s Witnesses, or the compulsory veiling and female circumcision of women in parts of the Islamic world. Why is one practice banned while another allowed.

It’s just a matter of time until we have the next global pandemic. There’s a fascinating article in today’s Guardian about the likelihood of the world experiencing a devastating pandemic, even more deadly that the Spanish Flu of 1918-19. 
It’s just a matter of time until we have the next global pandemic. There’s a fascinating article in today’s Guardian about the likelihood of the world experiencing a devastating pandemic, even more deadly that the Spanish Flu of 1918-19. 
No Flat Screen?

It’s no surprise that many people aren’t getting enough exercise. A recent report by the British medical journal, the Lancet, reported that nearly a third of adults (31 percent) are getting insufficient exercise. The study was able to pool data from 122 countries, covering 89 percent of the world’s population.

Malta is the world’s most slothful country, with 72 percent of adults getting too little exercise. Swaziland and Saudi Arabia follow close behind. There’s good news for the USA. Despite our reputation as being couch potatoes, we are actually getting more exercise than many countries, including Britain, Spain, Portugal, Argentina, Ireland, South Africa, Japan, Turkey, Brazil, and Italy. In contrast, Bangladesh is considered the most active country in the world where just five percent of adults are considered inactive. 

Myth or Reality: the Stereotypical American?

The report considers sufficient physical activity to be 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week, 20 minutes of vigorous exercise three days a week, or some combination of the two. It’s tragic that so many people are unable to meet such a low threshold of activity. 

No Flat Screen?

It’s no surprise that many people aren’t getting enough exercise. A recent report by the British medical journal, the Lancet, reported that nearly a third of adults (31 percent) are getting insufficient exercise. The study was able to pool data from 122 countries, covering 89 percent of the world’s population.

Malta is the world’s most slothful country, with 72 percent of adults getting too little exercise. Swaziland and Saudi Arabia follow close behind. There’s good news for the USA. Despite our reputation as being couch potatoes, we are actually getting more exercise than many countries, including Britain, Spain, Portugal, Argentina, Ireland, South Africa, Japan, Turkey, Brazil, and Italy. In contrast, Bangladesh is considered the most active country in the world where just five percent of adults are considered inactive. 

Myth or Reality: the Stereotypical American?

The report considers sufficient physical activity to be 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week, 20 minutes of vigorous exercise three days a week, or some combination of the two. It’s tragic that so many people are unable to meet such a low threshold of activity. 

One in three people over the age 65 will develop Alzheimer’s. Currently, there is no cure for this devastating illness; however, there is good news on the horizon. A new drug therapy could halt deterioration in people with early symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

The drug, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), prevents the decline of cognitive skills, memory, and the ability to live independently, among patients with mild to moderate symptoms of Alzheimer’s. A small number of patients who took the highest dosage of the drug for three years showed no decline in memory. This latest finding in the battle against Alzheimer’s was revealed at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. A larger study involving 400 patients will be concluded in a year.

One in three people over the age 65 will develop Alzheimer’s. Currently, there is no cure for this devastating illness; however, there is good news on the horizon. A new drug therapy could halt deterioration in people with early symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

The drug, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), prevents the decline of cognitive skills, memory, and the ability to live independently, among patients with mild to moderate symptoms of Alzheimer’s. A small number of patients who took the highest dosage of the drug for three years showed no decline in memory. This latest finding in the battle against Alzheimer’s was revealed at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. A larger study involving 400 patients will be concluded in a year.

Here’s an interesting article from today’s Guardian. I’ve always believed that a person has the right to die. If I was Mr. Nicklinson, I would do the same thing: seek a lawful means to end my life. Why be condemned to a life of increasing misery. Whose life is it anyway?

I’m not religious, and I’ve never bought into the sanctity of life crap. My motto continues to be: Live with dignity and die with dignity. If the need ever arises, I’m headed to Dignitas

Here’s an interesting article from today’s Guardian. I’ve always believed that a person has the right to die. If I was Mr. Nicklinson, I would do the same thing: seek a lawful means to end my life. Why be condemned to a life of increasing misery. Whose life is it anyway?

I’m not religious, and I’ve never bought into the sanctity of life crap. My motto continues to be: Live with dignity and die with dignity. If the need ever arises, I’m headed to Dignitas